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University of Missouri, KC 
Conservatory of Music
4949 Cherry
Kansas City, MO 64110-2229
voice:  816/235-2940
fax:    816/235-5265


Press



Paul makes incredibly beautiful music from musical tones and environmental sounds of widely varying recognizability…”
KYLE GANN http://www.artsjournal.com/postclassic/ September 15, 2008, 9:28



The most fascinating work on the program was Paul Rudy's "Sibling Rivalries." The piece was
composed for Roger Landes, a virtuoso on the Irish bouzouki and co-founder of the Celtic band
Scartaglen.

The work presented a fascinating dichotomy of sound, with Landes simultaneously playing live and in
excerpts previously recorded by Rudy.
TIMOTHY MCDONALD, KANSAS CITY STAR, Nov. 02, 2008




November Sycamore Leaf brought together sound and video in a stunning combination. The visual changes, which the composer had orchestrated within the picture of the leaf, were nicely matched by the development of the sounds. This was a truly beautiful piece.

ALAN COOPER, UNIVERISTY MUSIC, UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN
May 3, 2007
http://www.abdn.ac.uk/universitymusic/review-details.php?id=67&season=



Vastly Shrinking Space, Madeleine Shapiro, cello: newEar, February 3, 2007, Unity Temple, Kansas City, MO

"...the most interesting work was the newest--a world premier by UMKC Conservatory composer Paul Rudy."

"It takes courage and audacity, perhaps, to write a piece about 'finding equilibrium,' in Rudy's works, 'between the wildness of a mechanized culture and a calm that comes from discovering peace inside one's own spiritual place.' But Vastly Shrinking Space finds a potent middle ground by juxtaposing recorded sounds ranging from birds to trucks with vigorously scored, often lyrical cello passages. Saturday's artist, cellist Madeleine Shapiro, drew on a fistful of special effects, from glassy harmonics to weirdly manipulated glissandi. Rudy's recorded track consisted partly of prerecorded Shapiro, sounding in counterpoint with the liver performers. It is a work of real substance. One felt a real sense of struggle between the pleading cries of the cell and the monstrous machine-like churning. At one point a mechanized roar threatened to take over the cello entirely, until a bird-like sputtering signaled new hope and a coda of tender harmonics."

PAUL HORSLEY, KANSAS CITY STAR
February 5, 2007




Modern Works Concert with Madeleine Shapiro, Museum of Arts and Design, New York

"All week I’ve been making jokes about going to hear a piece using amplified cactus, and now it appears that I’ll have to eat my words, since the instrument in question (and its caretaker) produced some of the most stimulating sounds I’ve heard in a long time. (And in New York, the variety of sounds can be frightening.)"

 "For Degrees of Separation “Grandchild of Tree” I wish I could report that the small, barrel cactus, sitting in its pot rather unassumingly all night, had been specially flown in from the Arizona desert, but no: it came from a Home Depot store in upstate New York. As composer Paul Rudy added with a perfectly straight face, “I met this cactus about 10:00 this morning.” Inspired by John Cage’s Child of Tree (1975), also using an amplified cactus (plus pea pods), Rudy positions an amplifier in contact with the plant, and then almost magically, a mere flick of a finger on one of its spines creates a unique sort of “boing” sound. Using his fingertips, he traveled around the cactus, with different portions creating slightly different timbres. Occasionally he used one of the Museum’s metal visitor buttons as a kind of cactus guitar pick, and near the end (making me grit my teeth in mild anxiety) placed his hand over the prickly top of the plant and slowly turned his palm, creating a soft explosion of muffled popping sounds. To say that it was entertaining, riveting and compelling is an understatement, helped in no small measure by Rudy’s hilariously straightforward introduction before he began his delicate maneuvers. As he finished, I fully expected him to rush backstage in search of bandages, but no – he had plenty of time for graceful curtain calls in front of the cheering audience – many, like me, grinning with pleasure and no doubt a host of unanswered questions."

BRUCE HODGES, MUSIC WEB (APRIL 20, 2006)
http://www.musicweb-international.com/SandH/2006/Jan-Jun06/modernworks2004.htm




"Paul Rudy’s “For Whom ... ” was an inventive confabulation of prerecorded bits of famous arias from “Lucia di Lammermoor” and “Lakme,” mixed with sound-explosions from live instruments..."

PAUL HORSLEY, KANSAS CITY STAR
May 8, 2006



"This is one of those works that clearly make your mind go to incredible places. Throughout the work the sound sources are always playing with the possibility of being recognized but, to a certain limit, where they quickly change into staggering artificial gestures full of energy that move around the space in a way that shows the power of diffusion. “Thema:Omaggio” starts with a vocal improvisation and then evolves into sound worlds that evoke the inner space of the human body. I felt that the reverb and human-like gestures are powerful enough to take the listener through an electroacoustic homage to Berio's way of using a musical theme. "

RODRIGO SIGAL, SONIC ARTS NETWORK: DIFFUSION (London)
January, 2006
http://www.sonicartsnetwork.org/diffusion/diffusion_24_01_06.htm#review




"...Paul Rudy’s Soliloquy, a dazzling musical depiction of the composer’s climb up California’s Mount Shasta. Choral whooshes and whispers sounded just like a windy mountaintop."

PAUL HORSLEY, KANSAS CITY STAR
January 20, 2006



"Rudy plucked and stroked the cactus needles, his hands moving over them like a potter shaping clay."

JANE FORD, INSIDE UVA
Nov. 18 - Dec. 1, 2005, Vol. 35, Issue 2






"...I think Love Song is just wonderful.  ...the ending, especially, is a poetic moment of transcendent clarity..."

BILL KLEINSASSER, SEAMUS 2005
April 17, 2005




“Grandchild of Tree” worked from stasis to frenzy to the often pitched, often purely percussive sounds of composer Paul Rudy's music for cactus (amplified by contact mikes on its spines). The simplicity of dancers in lines — first behind Rudy, then seated upstage from him — to a pointillistic fervor in which sound and dance undulated into a diffuse blur.

-PAUL HORSLEY, KANSAS CITY STAR
April 11, 2005


FOX PHOTO
Download Dancking Clip (5.1 MB)
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"A friend of mine found it very spiritual.  She also said that the cactus felt like an alien to her and appeared to be glowing and that the interaction with it was about discovery and trying to communicate.  She was moved when everyone left the cactus-that that moment felt like a transformation or understanding had been achieved."

-SUSAN REGER, CHOREOGRAPHER, AHA! DANCE
April 9, 2005


"...another session paper looking at the use of spectral morphing in the film "Blackhawk Down" by Paul Rudy (it made me want to scamper off immediately, rent the film, and listen to it in the dark with the sound turned waaaaay up) it was time well spent."

GREGORY TAYLOR, FROM CYCLING 74: "ICMC and other things" on "Spectromorphology Hits Hollywood" paper given at the International Computer Music Conference in Miami, Florida
Posted on Fri Nov 12, 2004 at 02:24:01 AM EST
http://www.cycling74.com/story/2005/5/2/17059/38632






"...an interesting experiment in stylistic polygamy,  drawing on everything from traditional Chinese music to Bluegrass fiddle  playing."

-DAVID KIM-BOYLE, COMPUTER MUSIC JOURNAL: ITERNATIONAL COMPUTER MUSIC CONFERENCE REVIEW
October 1, 2003 (Fantasie for Erhu and Virtual Recorded Ensembles)





"It made my ears feel really dirty..."


-ANDREW MAY, ELECTRONIC MUSIC MIDWEST
 December 7, 2002 (Thema: Omaggio)





"Rudy's Church Keys for piano and electronics mixed a pair of half-recognizable hymns and fierce extended runs on the piano, all handled with grace and power by pianist Aglika Angelova.  The hymns were often matched with electronically created, out-of-tune piano sounds that seemed like a simultaneous, dusty memory of the live piano part.  Through the other sections of the piece, the palette of electronic sounds ranged from sweet to harsh.  This unpredictable expressive mix of lyricism and bluntness made possible a climax of some strength when the electronic part thickened into a blizzard of sound that was matched on the piano by Angelova,"

-BENJAMIN FRANDZEL, SAN FRANCISCO CLASSICAL VOICE: CONTEMPORARY MUSIC REVIEW
October 9, 2001




...far more restful to watch Paul Rudy play "Degrees of Separation: Grandchild of Tree," which involved a cool video track, a laptop computer and an amplified cactus.  Rudy...sat at a table with a cable junction box and an earthenware vase holding the semi-spherical cactus.  Rudy gently plucked its spines, coaxing forth liquid riples uncannily like the elctronic experimentation on Jimi Hendrix's "Electric Ladyland."
 

-JOHN FOYSTON, THE OREGONIAN, PORTLAND, OREGON 
October 12, 2001



Cactus music adds to wonder of newEar’s season opener

"Above all, ‘Bio Music’ will be remembered for the guy playing the cactus.  Paul Rudy’s ‘Degrees of Separation, Grandchild of Tree…’ was an interesting exploration of texture and rhythm.  Rather than the dry, dusty landscape the concept brings to mind, the amplified spines of the plant sounded not unlike the plinks and plonks of a child’s toy piano, lending an airy and playful mood to the performance."

-DEREK DONOVAN, KANSAS CITY STAR
September 30, 2000
 


"Paul Rudy's Parallax 2 'Apparitions' also contains a goodly share of delights.  The work sets out to meld its tape and cello parts into a nearly indistinguishable and complementary whole.  It succeeds quite will and goes a step further by smoothly playing the two entities off each other in fascinating ways; it kept this listener entertainingly guessing.  And...the work makes up for formal shortcomings with an engaging directional sense."

-DAVID CLEARY, NEW MUSIC CONNIOSEUR 
(Vol. 8, No. 2 - Summer 2000)


"There was one keeper on the concert....Paul Rudy's Parallax 2 'Apparitions' for cello and tape, which reveled in the sense of goal oriented directionality that so much contemporary music from the academy seems purposely to eschew."

BIRMINGHAM NEWS


"Moving from the broadly stated valleys to the not quite barren peaks, Character Sketches was a formidable visit to the Rocky Mountains."

THE PRESS, CHRISTCHURCH NEW ZEALAND

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